Cerritos College Falcon Gymnasium Seismic Upgrade/Renovation

Client: Cerritos Community College District
Services Provided: Programming, Design, Construction Documents, Construction Administration
Project Location: Norwalk, CA
Project Size: 25,748 sf
Completion Date: May 2013
Program: 3-Court Gymnasium, Storage Spaces, Ticket/Snack Bar Area, Studios
Association: IDS Group, Structural Engineers

scanned-originalgym-web+textThe Falcon Gymnasium is a renovation of the College’s distinctive 52 year-old mid-century modern gymnasium by celebrated architects Kistner, Wright and Wright. A state-funded seismic and accessibility upgrade to the building was the impetus to update and support Cerritos’ progressive-minded collegiate sports programs. Being the recipient of a breath of new life, the gym is once again the centerpiece of the athletic complex at Cerritos College. Upon entering the re-imagined lobby visitors pass the many trophies of the highly successful Falcon athletic program. A refinished floor, new energy efficient high-bay lighting and drought resistant landscaping reflect the intention to create a sustainable energy efficient solution that will carry the College for the next 50 years.

To encourage student life, accommodate a wide variety of programmatic activities, and support health education and wellness the original spaces were repurposed and augmented with technology. Monitors, projectors and moveable instructor tech podiums allow instruction to be delivered uniquely per the style of the instructor. Customizable sound systems allow multiple sound scenarios to support each type of event planned for the facility.

The biggest challenge was to preserve and restore the gymnasium’s signature “high design” curvilinear rolling-arched roof. An ingenious structural system called for large concrete shear walls, vierendeel steel trusses attached to and exposed on the exterior of the building, and 120- 70’ deep concrete piers drilled inside the gymnasium (after removing the entire sprung wood floor) to make the building more resistant to earthquakes.

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